Baltimore Riots

The details are murky. Baltimore is in shambles. Police are on high alert and the local government has deemed a state of emergency. Baseball games have been cancelled, police have been injured and hospitalized, local businesses have been burned and looted and there’s not much anyone can do about the ensuing chaos.

The media portrays a bunch of black people running around destroying the city. Throwing rocks at cops, smashing police cars, fighting innocent people; savages and thugs as some might call them. It’s a hard situation to decipher. Whichever side you land on, you’ll be met with ridicule and hatred.

People defending the cops continue to say. “well, if you don’t want your ass beat, don’t break the law!”

People defending the blacks continue to say, “who cares about his rap sheet! He shouldn’t have been killed while in custody!”

Both sides are genuinely correct.

The police have a responsibility to the people. Just because someone is a hardened street thug or common criminal, does not give the right for police officers to treat anyone like a sub-human piece of trash. The three major cases that have been in the spot light are the Michael Brown (Ferguson) case, the Eric Garner (New York) case and now the Freddy Gray case in Baltimore. Each case is unique and of course we can not predict how a law enforcement officer handles his every day responsibilities. We empower these people to uphold the law, keep our communities safe and help people who are in need. To be a police officer, one must¬†exercise good judgment, common sense and be professional at all times. These people are not robots. They’re human beings with emotions. Obviously the job is not for everyone.

The shocking thing to me is; the American culture likes to protest about a lot of things that aren’t conducive to a healthy society. Lately, it’s been about police brutality and defending criminals.¬†I understand that the Eric Garners and the Freddy Grays were sons and fathers. I understand that they have brothers and sisters and mothers who love them. What I don’t understand is how the black community can blatantly disregard their way of life that might lead to police contact. I’m not saying the police weren’t out of line. I’m simply saying their actions might be the reason for their situation. To not put that on the forefront is irresponsible.

We, as a human race, have a responsibility to get along. We have laws that we must protect and abide by. When we don’t play by the rules, we have to face consequences. On both sides.

But the social media responses are shocking…

“Can’t we all just get along?”