Political Bullsh*t

“This generation is so entitled.”

“This generation just wants hand outs.”

“This generation thinks everyone else should pay their way.”

“This generation is so lazy and unmotivated.”

I’m not trying to defend something I have no idea what I’m talking about. I’m also not trying to come up with wild allegations towards a group of people from what I see from a select few.

“This generation” has quite the stigma places on them in America. As do welfare recipients, black people, Mexicans and poor people. Rarely, do we find anyone in this country ridiculing the extreme rich or politicians.

Since this whole $15 dollar minimum wage battle that’s been surfacing in America, it’s been wildly concluded that spoiled, booger picking, lazy teenagers are the ones who’re going to benefit the most from a minimum wage hike. That these so-called entitled kids of this generation are simply asking for handouts and aren’t exactly working hard for their money or success.

I call bullshit. If it’s just the teenagers in well-to-do neighborhoods and families, who’re are spoiled and simply asking for someone else to get them through life, why in the world would they be slaving away at places like Taco Bell, McDonalds and Burger King flipping burgers? If that’s their aspirations in life (to be a full-time burger flipper in the back of some greasy McDonalds) then the problem is a lot worse than I thought it was.

First of all, since 2007 (when the economy took a nose-dive under the Bush administration) jobs have been at an all time low. The job market (and wages for that matter) are not thriving like they used to. 40 years ago you could get hired, join a union and thrive making $20 dollars an hour with benefits. It took only one member of the family to bring home the bacon, so to speak, while the other slaved away raising the kids and tending to the house. Now it literally takes two working parents to keep the lights on in the house and food in their children’s’ bellies. I have never seen people in my entire life slave away at their jobs more so then I have in this day in age. It’s sad, sickening and pathetic.

Let me tell you what it’s like to be an Army combat veteran in the civilian workforce. And I bet most of you can relate and the sad part is, I possess skill sets that most civilians do not. Not a dig; just the facts.

When I got out of the service after ten years, I was able to pick up this sh*tty job in retail security making about $10 dollars an hour. It wasn’t even full-time work. I practically begged for hours. I attempted to go to college in the mean time but I’m one of those educationally inept people that can’t stand listening to an instructor drone on about sh*t I don’t care about. Honestly, history was my passion- and sadly what will majoring in history do for me except make me really smart about history..?

I took a second job (full-time) as security in a casino. So between both jobs I was averaging about 60 hours a week. I’ve heard everything from, “wow, you must just be raking cash” to “I’m really sorry you have to work that hard for practically a kick in the nuts.” No, I was not “raking” cash as some would put it. I was barely clearing $20,000 a year. If that. And to be completely honest about uniformed (and un-uniformed) security jobs, they are basically glorified wanna-be police jobs. Being heckled and degraded daily by drug abusers, drunks and trashy women is probably the second worst thing about those jobs. Not being able to punch those people in the face without it coming back on you is the first worst thing about those jobs. But I took the abuse because it was work and I was (and I can’t believe I’m about to say this)  just glad I was employed.

It wasn’t until the following year that my VA benefits finally dropped. I waited patiently for roughly 20 months for some kind of outcome to all my problems that were dealt to my body while I was in service. From Patellofemoral syndrome in both knees to PTSD symptoms, night terrors, anxiety, depression, anti-social behavior..and the list goes on and on. The VA finally contacted me and gave decided to give me a check every month to help combat these issues. Plus, I get to visit the VA any time I want for whatever reason and I get to see a therapist every month.

After living in my car for nearly a year, I could finally get my own studio apartment. My VA check helped me financially. I quit both jobs and hired onto a different company (whom I still work for) and they give me lots and lots of overtime including other fringe benefits throughout the year like holiday pay, mileage and parking reimbursement in case I ever have to pay to park. Also, I get a 401k and benefits. Rarely do I get heckled as much by drug abusers, drunks and trashy women anymore. So that’s a plus.

That all seems really great and I’m very appreciative of the opportunities set forth before me and believe me; I’ve taken full advantage of it all. I’ve built my resume up and have really grown as a person. The sad part is this; if my VA benefits were to vanish, I’d be right back where I started from when I first got out. I’d be making more money, of course, but I wouldn’t be able to afford my apartment. And it’s not like I went out and bought the most expensive apartment out there. I got the cheapest, yet safest one I could find in a good community and I bank about 60% of my VA check every month. Truth is, these jobs today could pay more and will still do very well for themselves. We are all in this rat race together and what really upsets me is how this country defends the rich so much.

I’m not trying to get rich and I won’t die trying. I’m trying to afford a comfortable life that is fair. I’d like a few weeks of vacation time a year, solid benefits, good pay and a sound work environment. We spend a good portion of our lives at work, why not making it enjoyable? Why not making it worth our while? If you feel under paid and under appreciated at work, you probably are. Stop being a sheep and dig for what you’re really worth.

 

 

 

 

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